Thawing permafrost alters nematode populations and soil habitat characteristics in an Antarctic polar desert ecosystem

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TitleThawing permafrost alters nematode populations and soil habitat characteristics in an Antarctic polar desert ecosystem
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsSmith, TE, Wall, DH, Hogg, I, Adams, B, Nielsen, UN, Virginia, RA
JournalPedobiologia
Volume55
Issue2
Pagination75 - 81
Date Published3/2012
Abstract

Spatial distribution of soil nematode populations in Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems is tightly controlled by environmental factors and thus highly sensitive to changes in soil properties. Increases in the magnitude and frequency of episodic warming events as well as eventual warming trends are likely to result in increased water availability due to glacial melting and permafrost thaw, and may also incite changes in soil physical and chemical characteristics that determine nematode habitat suitability. We hypothesized that climate warming would result in new suitable soil habitats leading to heightened diversity and activity in nematode communities. In order to test this hypothesis, we compared nematode populations in patches of soil wetted by naturally enhanced permafrost thaw versus adjacent soils unaffected by thaw. We found that thaw sites had significantly lower nematode abundances and living to dead ratios, contradicting our hypothesis. We also observed significantly altered soil texture (finer particle size), lower pH and higher salinity in permafrost seeps. These observations suggest that current and future changes in climate may alter soil properties and result in significant changes in nematode population structure, distribution and function.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031405611001156
DOI10.1016/j.pedobi.2011.11.001